Motivational Quote – Selflessness

“It’s only when we forget ourselves that we do the things that deserve to be remembered.” – Rick Warren

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The Dark Sucker Theory – Part 2

In my previous post, I talked about a little known theory that can change the way you look at things.

This theory is called:

The Dark Sucker Theory

Here is the rest of the theory:

Dark has mass. When it goes into a Dark Sucker, friction from the mass generates hear. Thus it is not wise to touch an operating Dark Sucker. Candles present a special problem as the mass must travel into a solid wick instead of through clear glass. This generates a great amount of heat and is therefore even less smart to touch an operating candle.

Also, dark is heavier than light.

If you were to slowly swim deeper and deeper, you would notice it getting darker and darker. When you get real deep you would be in total darkness. This is because the heavier dark sinks to the bottom of a lake and the lighter light floats at the top. This is why it is called light.

Finally, we must prove that dark is faster than light. If you were to stand in a lighted room in front of a closed, dark closet and slowly opened the closet door, you would see the light slowly enter the closet. But since dark is so fast, you would not be able to see the dark leave the closet.

Next time you see an electric bulb, remember that it is a Dark Sucker!

The reason that I use this tool is to condition my audience’s mind to accept a different way of looking at things. When I do this I find that I am more successful teaching sales, marketing and leadership concepts that may different than the myths that they grew up with. (ie. That you need to be aggressive and pushy in order to be successful at Sales.)

Changing Perceptions: The Dark Sucker Theory

One of the key things to remember when you are delivering a speech or training session is that often you need to shake your participant’s deeply ingrained perceptions. One of the tools that I use to condition this change is a single sheet that I will put on my participant’s table at either one of the breaks, or when we come back for lunch.

This tool is called The Dark Sucker Theory. (I don’t know who created it, so if you know, I’d love to give them credit) Read it and tell me if you don’t look at things in a different way.

The Dark Sucker Theory

For years, it has been believed that electric light bulbs emit light, but recent information has proven otherwise.

Electric bulbs don’t emit light, they suck dark.

Thus we call these bulbs Dark Suckers. The Dark Sucker thory and the existence of Dark Suckers prove that dark has mass and is heavier than light.

First, the basis of the Dark Sucker theory is that electric bulbs suck dark. For example, take the Dark Sucker in the room that you are in. there is much less dark right next to it than there is elsewhere. The larger the Dark Sucker, the greater its capacity to suck dark than the ones in this room. As with all things, Dark Suckers don’t last forever. Once they are full of dark, they can no longer suck . This is proved by the black spot on a full Dark Sucker.

A candle is a primitive Dark Sucker.

A new candle has a white wick. You can see that after the first use the wick turns black, representing all the dark which has been sucked into it. If you put a pencil next to the wick of an operating candle, it will turn black. This is because it got in the way of the dark flowing into the candle. One of the disadvantages of these primitive Dark Suckers is their limited range. There are also portable Dark Suckers. In these the bulbs can’t handle all of the dark by themselves and must be aided by a Dark Storage Unit. When the Dark Storage unit is full, it must be either emptied or replaced before the portable Dark Sucker can operate again.

To learn the rest of the Dark Sucker Theory, check out my next post.

When giving a Presentation, what is the biggest obstacle to connecting with your audience?

In a recent LinkedIn post Ritzya Mitchell, The “Drama” queen at http://www.thedramacoach.com/index2.html asked:

When giving a Presentation, what is the biggest obstacle to connecting with your audience?

Here is my response:

 

Hi Ritzya,

I believe the biggest obstacle to connecting with your audience is focusing on you rather than the audience.

Focusing on what you are going to say, and how you are going to say it, and how you are going to look as a result of saying it, rather than what impact your message will have on your audience.

When I stopped worrying about me and started focusing on my audience, I found that I could relax more and then really connect with my audience.

The next biggest obstacle is not making enough meaningful eye contact with your audience members. And by meaningful eye contact, I am talking about looking at and talking directly to one audience member for a sentence or two and then moving on to another audience member. Not the quick side to side scan (that makes your head look like a typewriter) or the looking over people’s heads.

Look people in the eye and care about how your gift (message) is going to impact them and you will have no trouble connecting with your audience.

I hope this helps.

Making a difference,
Richard Elmes CSP
The Sales Dating Guy
www.RichardElmes.com

Profits vs. People: The Key to Reducing Employee Turnover

After writing the post titled: The Key to Reducing Employee Turnover https://relmes.wordpress.com/2008/08/24/the-key-to-reducing-employee-turnover/ I found this quote from Mary Kay Ash founder of Mary Kay Cosmetics http://www.marykay.ca/en/, one of the largest and most successful direct selling organizations in the world:

“Of course I’m concerned about profits and losses. I just don’t give them top priority. If you treat people right, they will work more efficiently and the profits will come in.” – Mary Kay Ash

It sounds like smart advice from a very smart business leader.

The Key to Reducing Employee Turnover

Employee turnover is crippling many organizations.

Here are some thoughts on this subject from Leigh Branham, Author of the book titled: Keeping the People who Keep you in Business. http://www.keepingthepeople.com/ (excellent book)

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Which is more expensive, the cost of doing the things necessary to retain your most valuable people, or the cost of losing and replacing those people?

The companies that achieve dramatic reductions in turnover are often the ones at which the top executive or owner makes the commitment to do something about it.

When the CEO is committed, the organization usually falls in line.

If your CEO is not committed enough to retaining the right people as a long-term business strategy, it may be only because he or she has not yet realized the cost implications and long-term business consequences of continuing turnover. If you run the numbers, most CEO’s and CFO’s, of course will pay attention to them.

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In my experience, I have found this to be true, because as I often say,

“The number one sport in business is watching the boss.”

And when the boss see something as important, the employees take it a lot more seriously.

How to create Powerful Introductions

I asked him, “So what do you do?” and he replied, “I sell insurance.”

How boring!! In a previous post (you can check it out here https://relmes.wordpress.com/2008/03/06/how-to-become-more-effective-at-networking-events-part-9/ ) I wrote about how to develop your audio-business card and why doing so in a way that differentiates you from your competition can positively impact how you are perceived.

Remember, “Your customer’s perception is your reality.”

I am currently reading an excellent book titled: Becoming Preferred – How to Outsell your Competition by Michael Vickers. http://www.michaelvickers.com/ 

Here is what her wrote (I love, this section) about Creating your Introduction.

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Your Introduction

The most important thing you can do in formulating a powerful introduction is to first define the benefits of what you do rather than simply describing what you do. For example, let us say that I sell insurance. You meet me at a local watering hole and during the course of our conversation you ask me what I do for a living. I reply,

“I sell insurance.”

Do you need any more information?

Do you feel like introducing me to all of your friends?

Do you get an overwhelming urge to invite me home for dinner and develop a relationship with me?

I don’t think so. Let’s face it, there is nothing wrong with selling insurance, it is just that you have been there and done that! Saying you sell insurance does not create excitement not does it create interest.

A number of years ago i was in a golf tournament. During the course of the tournament I struck up a conversation with a professional looking gentleman whom I had not met before.

The initial conversation was polite and then I asked him what he did for a living. He replied,

“I am a golf fund specialist”

That caught my curiousity and I replied, “What do you mean a golf fund specialist?” “Well, ” he said, “I help executives enjoy the game of Golf today and well into their retirement.” “How do you do that?” I asked, He then stated, “I would love to show your how I do it. If you give me your business card I will be happy to give you a call and perhaps we can continue this conversation over coffee.”

Am I interested in meeting with this person? Absolutely.

Guess what he does for a living?

He sells insurance!

The products he sells are financial products, but the benefit of what he sells is financial security. His marketing target is the business professional who golfs.

The market has thousands of insurance agents and financial planners, but how many “golf fund specialists” do you know?

“It is not what you do that counts, but the benefit of what you do.” – Michael Vickers

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Now that is what I call a sexy introduction!!!