Motivational Quote: Your Legacy

Your Legacy

“How you use the opportunities you are given to affect the world around you will determine the legacy you leave behind.” – Tony Dungy, Former NFL Football Coach, Author

Confidence Boost

confidence-level

“Don’t underestimate the positive impact you can have on someone’s life when you help boost their confidence.” – Richard Elmes

Inspirational Poem: The Reward is Within

This poem was written by the Memory Man, Bill Clennan who many also called the Dean of Canadian Professional Speakers. He would have turned 72 years old today (Jan. 16th, 2016), but unfortunately passed away over 5 years ago. This was the way he closed many of his speeches. Whether you are an athlete or not, this is a very powerful and inspirational message. Please enjoy and remember The Memory Man.

THE REWARD IS WITHIN -Bill Clennan

Hockey PracticeThe contest lasts for moments
Though the training’s taken years,
It wasn’t the winning alone that
Was worth the work and the tears
The applause will be forgotten
The prize will be misplaced
But the long hard hours of practice
Will never be a waste
For in trying to win
You build a skill

You learn that winning
Depends on will
You never grow by how much you win
You only grow by how much you put in
So any new challenge
You’ve just begun
Put forth your best
And you’ve already won.

Bill Clennan, Canadian Motivational Speaker

#hockey, #baseball, #sports, #Professional Speaker, #Bill Clennan, #The Reward is Within, #Canadian Speakers, #CAPS, #Memory, #Hard Work, #Workout, #Winning, #Reward, #Practice, #Training

Motivational Quote: Future Vision

future-vision“If you cannot see and do not believe it will not be.” Jamie Pritchard, Facilitator, Magnetic Lighthouse podcast, Spiritual Coach

What Amazing Bosses Do Differently

Worlds Best Boss

This blog post was from the Harvard Business Review and written by Sydney Finkelstein author of Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Manage the Flow of Talent where he talks about 5 things Amazing Bosses do differently.

We all know that job satisfaction often hinges on the quality of the relationships we have with our bosses. Yet in today’s rapidly evolving, 24/7 workplaces, it’s not always clear what managers should do to create the most satisfying work experiences and the happiest employees. My research into the world’s most successful bosses has unearthed some common practices that make work much more meaningful and enjoyable. If you supervise others, make sure you do the following:

Manage individuals, not teams. When you’re under pressure, it’s easy to forget that employees are unique individuals, with varying interests, abilities, goals, and styles of learning. But it’s important to customize your interactions with them. Ensure you understand what makes them tick. Be available and accessible for one-on-one conversations. Deliver lessons cued to individual developmental needs. And when it comes to promotion, look past rigid competency models and career ladders for growth opportunities tailored to the ambitions, talents, and capacities of each person.

Dr. Paul Batalden, a professor emeritus at Dartmouth College’s Geisel School of Medicine, who previously worked under Tommy Frist at healthcare giant HCA, told me that his former boss was “such an unusual CEO” of a company that size. “You could always get to see him. He always had time.”  Samuel Howard, another Frist protégé who is now CEO of Xantus Corp, added, “when you asked him to do something, he would roll up his sleeves” and work with you to get it done.

Go big on meaning.  Most employees value jobs that let them contribute and make a difference, and many organizations now emphasize meaning and purpose in the hopes of fostering engagement. But this is also the manager’s responsibility. You can’t rely on incentives like bonuses, stock options, or raises. You’ve got to inspire them with a vision, set challenging goals and pump up their confidence so they believe they can actually win. Articulate a clear purpose that fires your team up, set expectations high, and convey to the group that you think they’re capable of virtually anything.

Legendary bosses like Bill Sanders in real estate, Julian Robertson in hedge funds, and Bill Walsh in professional football all communicated visions that entranced employees and left them hell-bent on success. Scot Sellers, a protégé of Sanders who went on to become CEO of Archstone before retiring in 2013, recalled that his former boss “would lay out his vision and say, ‘I would like you to be a part of it.’ You were so honored to be asked… that you just wanted to jump in and say, ‘Sign me up!’”

To read the other 3 things that Amazing Bosses do differently click here:


 

Sydney Finkelstein is the Steven Roth Professor of Management in Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and the author of Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Manage the Flow of Talent (Portfolio/Penguin, February 2016) from which this article was adapted.

There are Precisely Two Ways to End Negative Headlines

The following post was written by Jeff Chatterton, who is a Risk Communications expert. I think the timing of this post is perfect in light to the public relations situation happening today with the Toronto Blue Jays losing the Major League Baseball’s Executive of the Year, Alex Anthopoulos.

MLB Executive of the Year leaves the Toronto Blue Jays

MLB Executive of the Year leaves the Toronto Blue Jays

Checkmate Public Affairs ran an informal survey on LinkedIn recently, asking 1,000 tourism officials to identify their biggest concern. It’s heavy stuff… the ‘biggest concern’ question is interesting to ask but scary to answer, and we received a range of scary answers back. We had answers citing everything from disgruntled employees, currency devaluations, terrorism concerns to TripAdvisor ratings. But the most common issue cited, regardless of nationality or business size, was ‘negative headlines.’

‘Negative headlines’ are scary for a bunch of reasons. No one likes to see their name in the news for the wrong reasons. Bad stories hurt revenue, bookings and sponsorship. They negatively impact employee morale and goodwill.

Scary headlines are pervasive. Obviously, we’ve all seen them. Any business leader has a collection of stories starring crazy customers or crazy circumstances. But no matter how whacky the circumstances, every damaging story out there has something in common – how to finish it. As wide-ranging as ‘negative headlines’ may be, there are still two ways – and only two ways – to kill a damaging story.

Read the rest of the post and learn the two ways by clicking here.