How to treat children and employees

Children-Dreaming

“Treat a child as though he already is the person he’s capable of becoming.” Haim Ginott, School Teacher, Child Psychologist, Psychotherapist and Parent Educator

Also great advice for Leaders on how to treat the folks they are leading.

Dating and Sales – It’s not that different

I think we have another convert to the Sales Dating philosophy.

Here is an article by Greta Schulz.    http://www.b2bsalesplaybook.com/clubportal/ClubStatic.cfm?clubID=2173&pubmenuoptID=24674  Greta Schulz is the President of Proactive Training.

Dating and Sales – It’s Not That Different

Remember when you were dating, and you went out with someone for the first time? For example, let’s say you’re female (though the principle applies to both). You really felt from your first meeting with a gentleman that he was charming, romantic, seemed to love kids … you know, different from other guys.

Then you go out on a date. He takes you to a nice dinner at a beautiful restaurant. After you order the meal, he starts the conversation and it sounds something like this:  

“You know, I’m really glad we had an opportunity to get together. I’m so busy with my career that I don’t really date a lot. It’s a shame because I’m really a romantic person and would love to share that side of me more often. I can’t wait until the day when I can settle down and have a family. I would love to have kids and spend all of my time with them. I really want to be a great dad …”  

At this point in the date, if you have half of a brain in your head, you’re ready to bail. Why? These are all of the things you want in someone, right? Right. But this guy is probably none of them. He just told you he is all of these things and more, so why don’t you believe it?  

Because when someone tells you how wonderful he is, especially right up front, do you believe it? Of course not. Besides, if these things were true, he wouldn’t say them. He would demonstrate them. And a wonderful way to do that is to ask about you. He needs to find out what you like, get you talking and stop telling you about him.  

Selling works the same way. Until we start selling to robots, we’re dealing with humans. Human nature is the same, whether it’s personal or business.

“People often make decisions and assumptions from the things we don’t say, not the things we do.” – Greta Schulz  

Am I suggesting you just sit there without talking? Actually, yes. At the beginning, you need to ask and not tell. No one believes how wonderful and terrific you and your product are until they trust you and your word. You have to build credibility.  

Credibility isn’t something you establish by telling someone how great you are or how great your company is. Most of you are saying right now, “Greta, I don’t do that.” Really? Let me demonstrate.  

“So John, why should we go with your product when we have been using ABC’s product for so long and it has worked fine?”  

“Well, Mr. Jones, one of the reasons we stand out is the blah blah blah, and we also have superior customer service and blah blah blah …” Sound familiar? So many of you do this. This is exactly what I’m talking about. You gain credibility by listening. So shut up and listen! Ask some good, solid questions and listen to the answers. Listen for some things that you may be able to help with, then when it’s your turn, use the answers your prospect gave after your questions to compare back.  

Let’s go back to our dating example. What if you went out with this same guy (in this case), and, after dinner, he asked you a few questions.  

“So, you said you’re an attorney. Do you enjoy practicing law? How long have you lived here? Do you have family here? Yes, mine is up north, too. I love it here, but I do miss them sometimes. How about you? I hope to have my own family some day.  

You say: “Really, do you think you’ll be a good dad?”  

“I don’t know, but I hope so.”  

Sound better? Yes, of course. Did you learn something? Sure did. Do you want to learn more? Ask and listen, don’t tell. This is for both on a date and in a sales call. Remember, it’s just about people. Relax, learn, ask and stop selling!

 

The Tradition of Champions: The Common thing that all Champions do

He fell to his knees and looked heaven-ward as his teammates sprinted out to congratulate each other in a heap of baseball players that resembled little kids. And in some ways they were little kids.

Little kids that are blessed with the talent to play a game at such high levels that they receive millions of dollars for it.

Who am I talking about?

I am talking about the Philadelphia Phillies Baseball Club right after their ace closer Brad Lidge struck out the Tampa Bay Rays, Eric Henske for the final out to win their 2nd World Series, and first since 1983. http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/gameTrax?gameId=281027122&refreshRate=30&MSNHPHMA

Both teams played their hearts out and in the locker room celebrations amonst all the traditions which includes lifting the trophy over their heads, putting on the special commemerative gear (T-shirt and Hat) and showering each other with champaigne their is another tradition that almost each and every player cherishes.

The tradition that I am talking about is having the opportunity to thank some of the people (whether it be parents or a little league coach) that helped them get to where they are today. And to be able to do it on National TV with millions of people watching makes the moment even sweeter.

Because nobody, not one player got to where they were today all by themselves. They all had teachers or coaches or friends and family that taught them the game, encouraged them to compete and celebrated their victories (and defeats) with them.

This is true in other endevours, not just sports. In business, mentors can help leaders move to the top of their profession. In families, parents and friends can mentor young boys to become men and young girls to grow up to be mature ladies.

And when you get to the top of your game, remember the tradition of champions and thank those who helped you get there.

Because it is easy for us to say we did it all on our own, but it takes a true champion to share the glory with those who helped them along the way.

Valuing the “Golden Moments” in our life

You could tell that she was fighting back the tears.

No, they were not tears of sadness.

No, they were not tears of shame.

But instead they were tears of joy and tears of relief.

Years of training, years of practice and years of competitions led to this moment.

This was her moment to shine.

This was the moment that Shawn Johnson, http://results.beijing2008.cn/WRM/ENG/BIO/Athlete/5/221035.shtml the 16 yr. old gymnast from the United States of America had dreamed about for years.

This was the moment when Shawn Johnson, the Olympic Gold Medalist in the (2008 Beijing Summer Olympics) Women’s Gymnastics Beam Event heard her national anthem being played because of her accomplishment. http://gymnastics.teamusa.org/news/article/5749

Can you imagine what it would be like, if that was you?

Can you imagine how proud you would be?

Proud of the effort, proud of the accomplishment and proud of the commitment that you put into having this experience. 

I can only imagine how much I would value the experience.

“We place value on things in the same proportion as it took to acquire it.” -Richard Elmes

And I am sure that Shawn will cherish that moment for the rest of her life.

This makes me think about whether I cherish the “Golden Moments” in my life.

The “Golden Moment” when I make the big sale, the “Golden Moment” when I make the big presentation or the “Golden Moment” where I can influence others in a leadership role.

Do you cherish those “Golden Moments” in your life?

Not only when we achieve success at work, but when we achieve a success with our spouse or kids.

I think this is a lesson that most people tend to fall short of. So next time you experience a “Golden Moment” remember all the hard work that it took to get to that point. And then be like Shawn Johnson and be proud of your accomplishment. Because you deserve it.

Lessons learned from Canada Day Celebrations and how they can impact your next presentation

Their was a hush through the crowd as they waited in anticipation. They moment they waited for has finally arrived. 

My family has a tradition every Canada Day (July 1st). Our local Rotary Club puts on a big show at Riverside Park (in Guelph, Ontario, Canada) that seems to attract the entire city. They do a fantastic job or organizing many events during the day. Events from pony rides and ring toss, from train rides (on the miniture train that goes around the park) to the midway. They arrange for the food vendors to be there (including Tim Hortons) and even a petting zoo for the kids (of all ages).

But the one thing which is the big draw of the day, the one thing that is the highlight of the day is always the fireworks display. This is usually the last event of the evening (that people stay for anyway) and the thing that people remember the most.

If you want to see part of last years fireworks display click here:

And you know this is the same principle that holds true in your presentation. The most important part, the part that your audience is going to walk away with and remember the most is your finale.

Ending your speech with a big bang will make more of a positive impact on how your audience feels about the experience than if your ending just fizzles out.

In my next post I will outline a few key strategies for ending your speech with a bang that will have them talking about you and your presentation well into the future.

How to win with class (Lessons learned from the Stanley Cup winning Detroit Red Wings)

Last night the Detroit Red Wings won the Stanley Cup for the 4th time in 11 years, as they defeated Sidney Crosby and the Pittsburgh Penguins 3-2 to win the Cup in 6 games (4-2).

After watching the television coverage of the celebration, 3 things stood out.

These 3 things are great examples of winning with class.

1. Shake hands: After battling so hard with the Penguins all series, both teams met at centre ice in order to shake hands and congratulate each other, not only on a hard fought series, but on having a successful season (Remember even Pittsburgh beat out 28 other teams to make it to the finals).

2. Celebrate: Taking the time to celebrate their victory is a critical part of what makes those moments sweet. Almost every kid who ever played hockey has dreamed of lifting up Lord Stanley’s Cup. And it would be a shame if they skipped that part of the dream, in order to chase their next dream. Unfortunately, people in business tend to do just that. They fail to take the time to celebrate their victories in order to persue their next goal.

Have you ever been guilty of doing this? If so, next time you make that big sale or wow them in your next presentation, stop and savour the victory. You will be glad you did. And it will help keep you motivated when you move on to that next goal.

3. Share the Glory: Almost every player who was interviewed took the time to thank those who helped them get there. Whether it was their parents who drove them to the rink, their minor hockey coach who taught them the skills or their wife, kids and friends for sticking with them during the journey.

Not one player got up and said that they did it all themself. The reason for this is simple. We need others to help us succeed and it is only appropriate to thank those who encouraged and supported them in their life and career.

And the same is true in our careers. So I encourage you to send a little note to someone who has helped you in your career. Not only will you feel good about sharing the glory, but it will make their day and allow them to feel like a winner as well.

So, congratulation to the Detroit Red Wings, 2007-2008 Stanley Cup Champions, you deserve it. And thanks for the great lessons on how to win with class.