How leaders get the most out of their folks

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What Amazing Bosses Do Differently

Worlds Best Boss

This blog post was from the Harvard Business Review and written by Sydney Finkelstein author of Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Manage the Flow of Talent where he talks about 5 things Amazing Bosses do differently.

We all know that job satisfaction often hinges on the quality of the relationships we have with our bosses. Yet in today’s rapidly evolving, 24/7 workplaces, it’s not always clear what managers should do to create the most satisfying work experiences and the happiest employees. My research into the world’s most successful bosses has unearthed some common practices that make work much more meaningful and enjoyable. If you supervise others, make sure you do the following:

Manage individuals, not teams. When you’re under pressure, it’s easy to forget that employees are unique individuals, with varying interests, abilities, goals, and styles of learning. But it’s important to customize your interactions with them. Ensure you understand what makes them tick. Be available and accessible for one-on-one conversations. Deliver lessons cued to individual developmental needs. And when it comes to promotion, look past rigid competency models and career ladders for growth opportunities tailored to the ambitions, talents, and capacities of each person.

Dr. Paul Batalden, a professor emeritus at Dartmouth College’s Geisel School of Medicine, who previously worked under Tommy Frist at healthcare giant HCA, told me that his former boss was “such an unusual CEO” of a company that size. “You could always get to see him. He always had time.”  Samuel Howard, another Frist protégé who is now CEO of Xantus Corp, added, “when you asked him to do something, he would roll up his sleeves” and work with you to get it done.

Go big on meaning.  Most employees value jobs that let them contribute and make a difference, and many organizations now emphasize meaning and purpose in the hopes of fostering engagement. But this is also the manager’s responsibility. You can’t rely on incentives like bonuses, stock options, or raises. You’ve got to inspire them with a vision, set challenging goals and pump up their confidence so they believe they can actually win. Articulate a clear purpose that fires your team up, set expectations high, and convey to the group that you think they’re capable of virtually anything.

Legendary bosses like Bill Sanders in real estate, Julian Robertson in hedge funds, and Bill Walsh in professional football all communicated visions that entranced employees and left them hell-bent on success. Scot Sellers, a protégé of Sanders who went on to become CEO of Archstone before retiring in 2013, recalled that his former boss “would lay out his vision and say, ‘I would like you to be a part of it.’ You were so honored to be asked… that you just wanted to jump in and say, ‘Sign me up!’”

To read the other 3 things that Amazing Bosses do differently click here:


 

Sydney Finkelstein is the Steven Roth Professor of Management in Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and the author of Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Manage the Flow of Talent (Portfolio/Penguin, February 2016) from which this article was adapted.

How to Stop Your Employees From Leaving

This excellent blog post by was written by Kristy Schoenberg (Entrepreneur, Startups and People Ops Enthusiast)

big angry boss screaming at small startled worker

How to Stop Your Employees from Leaving

Long gone are the days of staying with a company for 30 years before collecting that prized gold watch. Today competition in the job market is fierce — but it’s not just the job seekers problem anymore.

When a valued team member quits his or her job, it can set off a chain of difficult events for the company — and the co-workers they leave behind.

First — bosses and teams often find themselves scrambling to divvy out the workload. Most (if not all) of the resigning individuals intellectual property is destroyed — and this can cause great frustration for all parties involved.

Second — depending on the talent that left — many of the remaining team members may feel shaken up over the loss — especially if they were a close friend or colleague. They may feel demotivated to continue working for a short time, and this can be disastrous for company productivity.

And third — hiring a replacement isn’t easy. Resumes flood in for unqualified candidates — tons of interviews — who has time for that?

Yet people managers everywhere still don’t get why their employees leave. Or more importantly how they can get them to stay.

Here are some simple tips to help you keep your team members on board (and keep them happy).

To read Kristy’s 6 tips click here.

 

How to be a Winner…guaranteed!

This weekend is the big championship weekend for many of the baseball teams in my home town.

So, all the hard work they put in during practices, all the skills and lessons they learned during the regular season all come down to the performance this weekend. And especially today, Championship day.

But I encourage all the competitors, coaches and fans to remember one more lesson.

That lesson is one that may be remembered more and have a bigger impact than most.

More than how to hit a curve ball, more than  how to turn a double play, and more than stealing a base.

This lesson is one that if it is not heeded, it can suck the fun out of and steal the joy out of the game.

The lesson is, that no matter what the final score ends up being is it vital to act with class.

WIN with CLASS, LOSE with CLASS.

If a player on the other team makes a great play on a ball you hit. Don’t get mad. Instead tip your cap.

If, in your opinion an umpire misses a call, don’t run out screaming like a mad man. Instead ask questions respectfully and accept their decision.

And if the score is not in your favour at the end of the game, shake hands and wish the other team well in the future games.

WIN with CLASS, LOSE with CLASS

WIN with CLASS, LOSE with CLASS

LOSE with CLASS.

But just as important is to WIN with CLASS.

When you respect your teammates, your coaches, your opponents and the officials, you are winning with class.

When you refrain from trash talking and putting others down, you win with class.

And when you avoid running up the score or taking the extra base  late in a game where you have a huge lead, you are winning with class.

The key fact is this. A couple years down the road most people won’t remember the score of the game.
What they will remember is the friends they meet and the lessons they learn.

And if the lesson you demonstrate is to WIN with CLASS, LOSE with CLASS, then regardless of the score of the game, you will be a winner…guaranteed!

 

Clutch Performers

David Price“Clutch performers are those who can relax in stressful situations”

-Richard Elmes

David Price, in his Toronto Blue Jays debut showed remarkable poise, in escaping a 4th inning jam where the Minnesota Twins had the bases loaded with none out, without giving up a run.

When it is clutch time in any situation, whether it be on the baseball diamond, family crisis or boardroom negotiations, the ones who thrive are the ones who can relax and perform the same way they do when the pressure is less.

On all stages of life, these clutch performers are worth their weight in gold.

If you have one of these folks on your team, treat them well, because they tend to be in high demand and if you don’t treat them well, there are many others that are willing to, and reap the rewards.

What is your top concern in managing a sales team?

Brent Mellow (Helping businesses improve their results with salesforce.com and the Force.com cloud platform.) asked the following question on LinkedIn:

What is your top concern in managing a sales team?

Here is my response:

Hi Brent,

My top concern in managing a sales team is always getting the team to  effectively maximize their selling time.

By spending more time in front of the right customers. (Those “A” clients who are most likely to buy our solution) Instead of wasting valuable selling time on administrivia and unproductive (and unprofitable) prospecting.

Also Paul Green (Member at UK Business Advisors Limited) added the following information on how salespeople spend their time.

A recent survey indicated that a poor salesperson spend their time as follows:

Active Selling 10%
Prospecting 10%
Problem Solving 14%
Downtime 17%
Travel Time 18%
Administration 31%

A good salesperson should ideally be allocating their time as per below:

Active Selling 35%
Prospecting 25%
Problem Solving 15%
Downtime 10%
Travel Time 10%
Administration 5%

If you would like to discover how to effectively maximize your sales team’s valuable selling time.

Call me @ 519-820-6207 and ask about my full-day training program titled: Prospecting Profitably

Motivational Quote: World Series Champions

“The willingness to be unselfish and play the game the right way… that is why we are champions.”  – Joe Girardi, Manager of the World Champion New York Yankees

New York Yankees 2009 World Series Champs

2009 World Series Champion New York Yankees