I see something in you…

Enjoy this Toastmasters International,  2014 World Champion of Public Speaking winning speech by Dananjaya Hettiarachchi.

Is it a pitch or a presentation?

There was an interesting conversation this morning on Facebook between three excellent professional speakers (I would highly recommend each one of them) about the difference between sales pitches and sales presentations.

Prospects hate being pitched to

Kelley Robertson

 http://www.kelleyrobertson.com/

It’s a sales presentation, not a pitch!! Pet peeve of mine!!

Kit Grant http://kitgrant.com/

How well you do it is more important than what you call it. Companies who start calling customers guests under the premise that this somehow creates better service are kidding no one except themselves. I don’t mind being “pitched” if it’s done well.

 Kelley Robertson

Point taken, Kit. However, in my opinion the vast majority of sales people “pitch” with very little effectiveness.

Kit Grant

You got that right.

Richard Elmes http://www.richardelmes.com

I think the key thing is the intended benefactor.

If your intent is for you to benefit… its a sales pitch.

If your focus is on how your prospect will benefit… its a sales presentation.

If they feel like you are pitching to them then you create a lose-lose situation.

If they feel like you are presenting solutions then you create a win-win situation.

Kelley Robertson

Great perspective Richard!
So next time you are offering your solution focus on how your prospect will benefit because they will know the difference.
If you want to learn how to turn your sales pitch into an effective customer-focused presentation that will secure more sales, contact me @ 519-820-6207 or richard@richardelmes.com

The 7+ Habits of Highly Effective Husbands- Habit#8: Use “The Pause” …Wisely

Before I tell you what “The Pause” is, I need to let you know a little bit about my wife. She is a type-A person who is always on the move. In fact I believe she only has two speeds… high and off.

And though she’s very smart, she sometimes doesn’t realize just how smart she truly is. And that is one of the reasons why I use, “The Pause”.

Because sometimes she’ll be upstairs, when I’m downstairs and she’ll call down to me and ask, “Rich, do you know where _________ is?”

(Pause)

“Never mind… I found it.”

Trust me… practicing this Habit will not only save you a ton of energy, but she won’t miss out on the satisfaction of finding what she was looking for herself.

But the trick is to make sure you don’t wait too long, because if she has to ask again… you’re screwed.

So remember to use Habit #8 “The Pause”… Wisely.

(Note “The Pause” is used in a different way than the Power of the Pause, that I learned at Toastmasters http://www.toastmasters.org, which will be subject for another blog post)

Check back next time when we will talk about one of the most critical, but under utilized tools that guys can use to keep their relationships (and sex lives) running smoothly.

Also, if you know of any husbands (or couples) that would benefit from reading these blogs feel free to send them the link to this blog https://relmes.wordpress.com

Motivational Quote: Vision

“Vision without action is merely a dream. Action without vision just passes the time. Vision with action can change the world.” – Joel Arthur Barker

The Dark Sucker Theory – Part 2

In my previous post, I talked about a little known theory that can change the way you look at things.

This theory is called:

The Dark Sucker Theory

Here is the rest of the theory:

Dark has mass. When it goes into a Dark Sucker, friction from the mass generates hear. Thus it is not wise to touch an operating Dark Sucker. Candles present a special problem as the mass must travel into a solid wick instead of through clear glass. This generates a great amount of heat and is therefore even less smart to touch an operating candle.

Also, dark is heavier than light.

If you were to slowly swim deeper and deeper, you would notice it getting darker and darker. When you get real deep you would be in total darkness. This is because the heavier dark sinks to the bottom of a lake and the lighter light floats at the top. This is why it is called light.

Finally, we must prove that dark is faster than light. If you were to stand in a lighted room in front of a closed, dark closet and slowly opened the closet door, you would see the light slowly enter the closet. But since dark is so fast, you would not be able to see the dark leave the closet.

Next time you see an electric bulb, remember that it is a Dark Sucker!

The reason that I use this tool is to condition my audience’s mind to accept a different way of looking at things. When I do this I find that I am more successful teaching sales, marketing and leadership concepts that may different than the myths that they grew up with. (ie. That you need to be aggressive and pushy in order to be successful at Sales.)

Changing Perceptions: The Dark Sucker Theory

One of the key things to remember when you are delivering a speech or training session is that often you need to shake your participant’s deeply ingrained perceptions. One of the tools that I use to condition this change is a single sheet that I will put on my participant’s table at either one of the breaks, or when we come back for lunch.

This tool is called The Dark Sucker Theory. (I don’t know who created it, so if you know, I’d love to give them credit) Read it and tell me if you don’t look at things in a different way.

The Dark Sucker Theory

For years, it has been believed that electric light bulbs emit light, but recent information has proven otherwise.

Electric bulbs don’t emit light, they suck dark.

Thus we call these bulbs Dark Suckers. The Dark Sucker thory and the existence of Dark Suckers prove that dark has mass and is heavier than light.

First, the basis of the Dark Sucker theory is that electric bulbs suck dark. For example, take the Dark Sucker in the room that you are in. there is much less dark right next to it than there is elsewhere. The larger the Dark Sucker, the greater its capacity to suck dark than the ones in this room. As with all things, Dark Suckers don’t last forever. Once they are full of dark, they can no longer suck . This is proved by the black spot on a full Dark Sucker.

A candle is a primitive Dark Sucker.

A new candle has a white wick. You can see that after the first use the wick turns black, representing all the dark which has been sucked into it. If you put a pencil next to the wick of an operating candle, it will turn black. This is because it got in the way of the dark flowing into the candle. One of the disadvantages of these primitive Dark Suckers is their limited range. There are also portable Dark Suckers. In these the bulbs can’t handle all of the dark by themselves and must be aided by a Dark Storage Unit. When the Dark Storage unit is full, it must be either emptied or replaced before the portable Dark Sucker can operate again.

To learn the rest of the Dark Sucker Theory, check out my next post.

When giving a Presentation, what is the biggest obstacle to connecting with your audience?

In a recent LinkedIn post Ritzya Mitchell, The “Drama” queen at http://www.thedramacoach.com/index2.html asked:

When giving a Presentation, what is the biggest obstacle to connecting with your audience?

Here is my response:

 

Hi Ritzya,

I believe the biggest obstacle to connecting with your audience is focusing on you rather than the audience.

Focusing on what you are going to say, and how you are going to say it, and how you are going to look as a result of saying it, rather than what impact your message will have on your audience.

When I stopped worrying about me and started focusing on my audience, I found that I could relax more and then really connect with my audience.

The next biggest obstacle is not making enough meaningful eye contact with your audience members. And by meaningful eye contact, I am talking about looking at and talking directly to one audience member for a sentence or two and then moving on to another audience member. Not the quick side to side scan (that makes your head look like a typewriter) or the looking over people’s heads.

Look people in the eye and care about how your gift (message) is going to impact them and you will have no trouble connecting with your audience.

I hope this helps.

Making a difference,
Richard Elmes CSP
The Sales Dating Guy
www.RichardElmes.com