Motivational Quote: Overcoming Fear

Home Run MovieNothing great happens when you hold back.”

From the movie Home Run

http://www.homerunthemovie.com

Motivational Quote: Olympic Adversity

This quote is dedicated to the Canadian Men’s Olympic Hockey Team after losing 5-3 to USA.

Canada faces up hill battle after losing to USA

“You may not be the champion of the day, but how you deal with adversity can still make you a winner.” – Richard Elmes, The Sales Dating Guy

Why Dating is Like Software Sales

Here is another example of the Sales Dating Mindset in this blog post by Saumil Mehta
If you’ve ever worked in an enterprise software company at the same time as being single, maybe you’ve noticed the similarities between dating and software sales. Here’s how:
  • Putting on a match.com profile is like going to a trade show.
  • Always out and about on the prowl? It’s called lead generation, folks.
  • Meeting different girls? Going on many first dates?  How about calling it what it is: a sales pipeline?
  • Going on ten dates without a goodnight kiss – poor ROI.
  • Getting fixed up by a friend? Well, that sounds a lot like inside sales supporting corporate sales, doesn’t it?
  • Getting screwed out of a makeout session by the girl’s annoying prissy little twit of a roommate? We like to call it bureaucratic wrangling and internal politics.
  • And finally, the single man’s dating mantra, which aligns so well with the sales cliche: “Always be closing (ABC)”. Need I say more?

Depressing? Natch. Disgusting in its objectification of relationships? Of course. But funny trumps all, folks.

Here is his blog: http://bitbubble.wordpress.com/2007/06/03/why-dating-is-like-software-sales/

 

Dating and Sales – It’s not that different

I think we have another convert to the Sales Dating philosophy.

Here is an article by Greta Schulz.    http://www.b2bsalesplaybook.com/clubportal/ClubStatic.cfm?clubID=2173&pubmenuoptID=24674  Greta Schulz is the President of Proactive Training.

Dating and Sales – It’s Not That Different

Remember when you were dating, and you went out with someone for the first time? For example, let’s say you’re female (though the principle applies to both). You really felt from your first meeting with a gentleman that he was charming, romantic, seemed to love kids … you know, different from other guys.

Then you go out on a date. He takes you to a nice dinner at a beautiful restaurant. After you order the meal, he starts the conversation and it sounds something like this:  

“You know, I’m really glad we had an opportunity to get together. I’m so busy with my career that I don’t really date a lot. It’s a shame because I’m really a romantic person and would love to share that side of me more often. I can’t wait until the day when I can settle down and have a family. I would love to have kids and spend all of my time with them. I really want to be a great dad …”  

At this point in the date, if you have half of a brain in your head, you’re ready to bail. Why? These are all of the things you want in someone, right? Right. But this guy is probably none of them. He just told you he is all of these things and more, so why don’t you believe it?  

Because when someone tells you how wonderful he is, especially right up front, do you believe it? Of course not. Besides, if these things were true, he wouldn’t say them. He would demonstrate them. And a wonderful way to do that is to ask about you. He needs to find out what you like, get you talking and stop telling you about him.  

Selling works the same way. Until we start selling to robots, we’re dealing with humans. Human nature is the same, whether it’s personal or business.

“People often make decisions and assumptions from the things we don’t say, not the things we do.” – Greta Schulz  

Am I suggesting you just sit there without talking? Actually, yes. At the beginning, you need to ask and not tell. No one believes how wonderful and terrific you and your product are until they trust you and your word. You have to build credibility.  

Credibility isn’t something you establish by telling someone how great you are or how great your company is. Most of you are saying right now, “Greta, I don’t do that.” Really? Let me demonstrate.  

“So John, why should we go with your product when we have been using ABC’s product for so long and it has worked fine?”  

“Well, Mr. Jones, one of the reasons we stand out is the blah blah blah, and we also have superior customer service and blah blah blah …” Sound familiar? So many of you do this. This is exactly what I’m talking about. You gain credibility by listening. So shut up and listen! Ask some good, solid questions and listen to the answers. Listen for some things that you may be able to help with, then when it’s your turn, use the answers your prospect gave after your questions to compare back.  

Let’s go back to our dating example. What if you went out with this same guy (in this case), and, after dinner, he asked you a few questions.  

“So, you said you’re an attorney. Do you enjoy practicing law? How long have you lived here? Do you have family here? Yes, mine is up north, too. I love it here, but I do miss them sometimes. How about you? I hope to have my own family some day.  

You say: “Really, do you think you’ll be a good dad?”  

“I don’t know, but I hope so.”  

Sound better? Yes, of course. Did you learn something? Sure did. Do you want to learn more? Ask and listen, don’t tell. This is for both on a date and in a sales call. Remember, it’s just about people. Relax, learn, ask and stop selling!

 

Motivational Quote: Others Opinion of You

“Someone’s opinion of you does not have to become your reality.” – Les Brown http://www.lesbrown.com

 

Should managers/leaders apologize?

The following question was posted on LinkedIn by Doyle  Slayton http://www.SalesBlogcast.com who is a trainer in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Should managers/leaders apologize?

I’ve worked for bosses who hold polar opposite views on the issue of whether or not a manager should apologize. One believes that a manager should never apologize to their employees. The other makes it a practice to apologize regularly for wrongdoings.

During the last few months, I’ve begun to solidify my views on the subject. Before I share my opinion…

What do you think… should leaders/managers apologize?

Here is my response.

__________________________________________________________________________________

Hi Doyle,

Everyone messes up at times. And because Managers often have to make decisions with incomplete information, the opportunity to mess up increases.

I believe that if a Manager doesn’t apologize and humble him/herself when this happens they will lose respect from their employees.

However, if the Manager does humble him/herself then they will gain respect in the eyes of their employees. They will be perceived as real. And their employees will work that much harder for them in the future.

So, if the situation warrents it, swallow that pride and apologize, because not only is it the right thing to do from a people perspective, but from a business perspective as well.

Great question.

Making a difference,

Richard Elmes CSP
“The Sales Dating Guy”
http://www.RichardElmes.com

Why you should always vote

My head hit the pillow but I still couldn’t sleep. My body was so exausted, but my mind was racing.

I had just logging 16 1/2 hours for Elections Canada, working as a Central Poll Supervisor (running 2 large polls and leading 7 others) for the Canadian Federal Election at the University of Guelph, but yet I was still juiced.

Now I am not one of those people who follow every move in politics, but I do stay abreast of most of the issues. Although I don’t endorse any one particular party, but I do love the idea that I of all people have a say in who will represent me and my riding in Parliment.

The cool thing about being stationed at the University was that many of the voters were exercising their privaledge to vote for the first time.

These students were excited to be able to have a say in how their country will move forward. 

Wouldn’t it be nice if more potential voters thought this way.

I remember a piece of advice that my Grade 7 History teacher (who was teaching us about politics) shared with us when he said,

“When every you have an opportunity to vote… vote.

Even if you don’t know what the issues are or even care about the issues at that time.

Vote anyway. (Even if you just spoil your ballat)

Because even if you don’t care about the issues then, someday you may care about some issue and you still want to have the privaledge to have your say.

Many countries around the world would love to have this privaledge. To have their voice heard. To be able to influence (even in a small way) the world they live in.

And if we don’t exercise that privaledge, we may find that one day that privaledge may be taken away from us. “

I have never forgotten that advice and I am proud to say that I have voted in every election that I have been eligable for.

And although this Canadian Election is over, there will be others (ie. United States Presidential Election and other Federal Provincial and Municipal Elections) and I hope many more young people exercise their privaledge to vote.